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Posts Tagged ‘Criminal Law’

Liberty Attorney Found Guilty of Obstruction of Justice

December 12th, 2017

Robert Young II, a 48 year old attorney from Liberty, Missouri, was convicted of obstruction of justice for stealing money that was meant for restitution.  According to the court records, Mr. Young stole approximately $62,000 in restitution money meant for the government.

If you have been charged with a crime and need representation, contact our law office at 816-524-4949 or visit our website at Hoorfarlaw.com.

IRS Refuses Money from Disgraced Attorney

December 8th, 2017

A Texas attorney, who is facing up to 20 years in a federal prison, tried to pay the IRS $82,400 towards his back taxes.  However, the IRS refused the money because the IRS believes the attorney stole the money from his law office’s trust account, which holds money that belongs to his clients.

If you have been charged with a crime or owe taxes to the IRS, contact our law office at 816-524-4949 or visit our website at Hoorfarlaw.com.

Lawyer Jailed for 18 Months for Defrauding NFL Players

September 27th, 2017

A former Chicago attorney has been sentenced to 18 months for orchestrating a tax fraud scheme that defrauded millions of taxes from the IRS and financially harmed NFL players.

If you have been charged with a crime and need legal help, contact our law office at 816-524-4949 or visit our website at Hoorfarlaw.com.

 Lee’s Summit Man Pleads Guilty to Making Fake Driver’s Licenses

September 25th, 2017


According to the Lee’s Summit Tribune, 27 year old Tracy Ford pled guilty to having over 2,300 copies of counterfeit Missouri driver’s licenses and counterfeit hardware.
If you have been charged with a crime, contact our law office at 816-524-4949 or visit our website at Hoorfarlaw.com.

 

Criminal Words to Know

September 20th, 2017

Courtesy of the Missouri Bar, here are a few legal words and their definitions regarding criminal law that you should be familiar with:

Bond – A promise to appear in court, which often includes a guarantee of money, and which is required for a person who has been arrested to get out of jail while waiting for a trial (sometimes called bail or a bail bond).
Charge – The formal statement that details what the arrested person is accused of doing. A charge may be brought: by an information, which is a sworn statement filed in court by a prosecutor; or by an indictment, which is filed by a grand jury.
Defendant – The person who is accused of committing a crime.
Evidence – Anything that can be used in court to show what is true and what is not.
Information and Indictment – The two types of documents that may be used to state the charge or charges against the defendant.
Guilty – Found, by either a judge or jury, to have committed the crime charged.
Grand Jury – Twelve citizens chosen from the community who hear evidence presented by the prosecutor and then decide whether the person arrested should be held for a trial. Grand jury meetings are held in private and are not open to the public or to a potential defendant.
(Petit) Jury – Twelve citizens chosen from the community who are asked questions to determine if they can be fair, who hear the evidence in a trial and decide what is true and whether the defendant is guilty or not guilty.
Not Guilty – The verdict required if the prosecution does not prove guilt beyond a reasonable doubt.
Preliminary Hearing – A court proceeding where a judge hears evidence to decide if the person arrested should be held for trial. This is an alternative to a grand jury.
Probation – An alternative to time in prison or jail. Conditions can be set by the judge, and may be supervised by a probation officer. Violation of conditions may result in revocation of probation and imposition of time in prison or jail.
Prosecutor – The lawyer for the government, either state or federal.
Sentence – The length of time in prison, in jail or on probation that is ordered by the judge. In some cases, the sentence is set by the jury. For some crimes, the sentence can be a fine instead of time in jail.
Voir Dire – The process of questioning potential jurors to determine if they can be fair.
Waive – To voluntarily give up a right.judgeeee

Homeless Cats

August 28th, 2017

cats

Your local cat lady may actually not be as crazy as you think. In 2011, Jan Van Dusen beat the IRS in a case over whether she could claim a deduction for providing foster care for stray and feral cats. She was a volunteer for an approved charity called Fix Our Ferals and she spent significant amounts caring for the cats in her home.

Critical to her victory was that she performed the services in conjunction with the charity and she performed volunteer work for the charity.

The case was heralded as a victory for animal rescuers, but ultimately Van Dusen was a loser as the City of Oakland raided her home and found many of her 100 cats to be suffering from disease and parasite infestation. She was then charged and convicted for animal cruelty, so perhaps your first instinct about crazy cat ladies was correct after all.

If you or someone you know has been charged with a crime or having tax issues, give us a call at 816-524-4949 or visit our website at www.Hoorfarlaw.com.

Attacking a Cop is a Costly Dangerous Felony

August 10th, 2017

assaulting an officer

Missouri law requires that a person serve 85% of their sentence if they are convicted of a dangerous felony.   Assaulting a police officer is considered a dangerous felony and therefore, if convicted of the crime, you may not be eligible for parole for a while.

If you have been charged with a crime and would like some legal help, contact our law office at 816-524-4949 or visit our website at www.Hoorfarlaw.com.

The Crime of Financial Exploitation of the Elderly

June 5th, 2017

elderly

In order to be convicted of financial exploitation of the elderly, a person must deprive the elderly of property by deception.  Convincing an elderly person to give you a loan without having any real plans of repaying the loan can be sufficient to be charged with financially exploiting the elderly.

If you have been charged with a crime and need legal help, contact our law office at 816-524-4949 or visit our website at Hoorfarlaw.com.

Being Charged with Endangering a Child

May 5th, 2017

child abuse

A Missouri woman was recently charged with endangering the life of a child when she sought no medical treatment during her pregnancy, used meth while she was pregnant, did not hospitalize the child when the child refused to eat, and secretly buried the child after it passed away.

If you have been charged with a crime and need legal representation, contact our law office at 816-524-4949 or visit our website at www.Hoorfarlaw.com.

No Warrants to Search the Internet

April 24th, 2017

computer

Missouri courts have ruled that there is no reasonable expectation of privacy when you make things public by posting them online.  Since you do not have an expectation of privacy on the internet, a warrant is not needed to search the items you posted on the internet, including software that looks for child photography and IP addresses that accessed the pornography.

If you have been charged with a crime and need legal assistance, contact our law office at 816-524-4949 or visit our website at www.Hoorfarlaw.com.